Question: Where Is Could Used?

Is used to proper English?

Used to refers to something familiar or routine, as in “I’m used to getting up early for work,” or to say that something repeatedly happened in the past like “we used to go out more.” Use to typically occurs with did; “did you use to work there?” or “it didn’t use to be like that,” describing something in the past that ….

Is used to example?

‘Used to + infinitive’: For example: I used to have long hair (but now I have short hair). He used to smoke (but now he doesn’t smoke). They used to live in India (but now they live in Germany).

Would is used for future?

Would is a past-tense form of will. If you are writing about past events, you can use it to indicate something that was in the future at that point in time, but is not necessarily in the future right now. In other words, you use would to preserve the future aspect when talking about the past.

What the difference between have and has?

Even though they come from the same word, there are slight differences in the way they’re used. Have is used with I, you, we, and they, while has is used with he, she, and it. The verb to have has many different meanings. Its primary meaning is “to possess, own, hold for use, or contain.”

What is the difference between was and had?

Had/has/have been is usually used for something that was done in the past and still applies (multiple events). Was/were usually applies to something done in the past that no longer applies (single event). Example: The well had been producing clean water.

Which is correct sentence?

In order for a sentence to be grammatically correct, the subject and verb must both be singular or plural. In other words, the subject and verb must agree with one another in their tense. If the subject is in plural form, the verb should also be in plur al form (and vice versa).

Which is correct I will or I would?

Will and would are verbs, and each can be used many different ways. Will can be a present tense verb that means to cause something to happen through force of desire. … Would is a past tense form of will. It is also a conditional verb that indicates an action that would happen under certain conditions.

Would and will in the same sentence?

The word would does not have a tense, but will is always future tense. Because of this, it is necessary to change got to get , which is future tense. Your second example is perfectly normal: there is no connection between the uses of will and would in the two clauses.

Which is or that is?

In a defining clause, use that. In non-defining clauses, use which. Remember, which is as disposable as a sandwich bag. If you can remove the clause without destroying the meaning of the sentence, the clause is nonessential and you can use which.

Where is had used?

This means you can use either a plural or singular subject in any point-of-view (first-person, second-person, or third-person). And, because it is used in the past tense, HAD is used as an auxiliary verb to form the past perfect and the past perfect-progressive tenses.

Will and would sentences examples?

A few more examples of the modal verb would: Would you like a piece of apple pie? (question) I’d (I would) like to have some milk. (request)…Firstly, the word would is the past tense form of the word will.Jack said he would finish the work the next day.Ann said she would write us soon.He hoped she would come.

Would instead of Will?

would is the past tense form of will. Because it is a past tense, it is used: to talk about the past. to talk about hypotheses (when we imagine something)

Has been or had been?

“Has been” is used in the third-person singular and “have been” is used for first- and second-person singular and all plural uses. … “Had been” is the past perfect tense and is used in all cases, singular and plural.

Where used to is used?

We can use “used to” to talk about a past habit or state. “Used to” is the same for all subjects, and you follow it with the infinitive without “to”: “I / You / He / She / We / They used to smoke.” To make the negative, use “didn’t” + use + to + verb.

Would be or will be meaning?

Will describes an action that is expected to take place in the future. It expresses certainty. Would describes something that was in the future at the time of the original action, but is no longer in the future now.

Can you or will you?

May implies that you are asking for permission. Can implies that you are questioning somebody’s ability. Will implies that you are seeking an answer about the future.

Where would is used?

The Many Uses of ‘Would’ in Everyday Speech, Part 1Uses of ‘Would’ExampleAsking someone to do somethingWould you mind passing the jelly?Reported speechAnita said that she would bring the drinks.Present unreal conditionals (imaginary situations)I would move to Japan if I spoke Japanese.5 more rows•Jun 28, 2018