What Is An In Jail Arraignment?

How long does it take for an arraignment?

before he/she is called upon to plead.” In federal courts, arraignment takes place in two stages.

The first is called the initial arraignment and must take place within 48 hours of an individual’s arrest, 72 hours if the individual was arrested on the weekend and not able to go before a judge until Monday..

What is the main purpose of the arraignment?

An arraignment is usually the first part of the criminal procedure that occurs in a courtroom before a judge or magistrate. The purpose of an arraignment is to provide the accused with a reading of the crime with which he or she has been charged.

What can I expect at an arraignment?

During the arraignment hearing the prosecutor or judge would read the charges to the defendant so he understood what he was being charged with and could, in response, decide if he needed to hire an attorney, gather up witnesses and other evidence or simply plead guilty.

What happens at an arraignment for shoplifting?

This court date is known as your arraignment. When you appear before the judge at your arraignment, you will be explained what the charges against you are. The judge will also ask you how you plead. … If you plead guilty or no contest, you will pay a fine, may be given community service and may do jail time.

What happens at an initial arraignment?

Either the same day or the day after a defendant is arrested and charged, they are brought before a magistrate judge for an initial hearing on the case. The defendant will also be asked to plead guilty or not guilty to the charges. …

Can the defendant talk to the prosecutor?

The State Bar’s ethics rules prohibit a prosecutor from speaking directly to a defendant if he or she knows that an attorney represents the defendant.

Do you go to jail after arraignment?

An arraignment is typically your first court hearing after you are arrested for a crime. … If you are denied bail or it will take you time to obtain a bail bond, then you may return to jail after your arraignment.

Can a judge dismiss a case at an arraignment?

It is possible for the judge to dismiss your case during an arraignment if he or she sees you’re the officers and the prosecution have a shaky foundation on which to charge you. Your attorney could ask the judge to drop the charges against you by filing a motion prior to your arraignment.

Will I be drug tested at my arraignment?

If you are not on bond or not currently on probation, you are not facing any drug testing. However, at your arraignment, don’t be the least surprised if you are required to test.

What happens after you are arraigned?

What happens after the arraignment? Some time after the arraignment, the abusive person will have to go to court for a pre-trial conference. At that conference, they may plead guilty to something that settles the case. If they do not plead guilty, the court will set a trial date.

What does jail arraignment mean?

An arraignment is a court proceeding at which a criminal defendant is formally advised of the charges against him and is asked to enter a plea to the charges. … Some states require arraignments in all felony and misdemeanor cases – any case in which the defendant faces possible incarceration, whether in jail or prison.

Do I need a lawyer at my arraignment?

The arraignment is the first time a defendant appears in criminal court, and you do have the right to have your attorney present at an arraignment.

What are the steps in arraignment?

Steps in a Criminal CaseStep 1: Arraignment. The first step in a criminal case is a court appearance called an arraignment, in which the charges against the defendant are read before a judge.Step 2: Preliminary Hearing. … Step 3: 2nd Arraignment (Superior Court) … Step 4: Pretrial Hearing & Motions. … Step 5: Jury Trial.

Can a felony charge be dismissed?

A felony case can be dismissed by motion of the prosecutor, the defendant’s attorney or the court . … Other ways for a defendant to get a felony charge dismissed is to go through trial and obtain a “not guilty” verdict or to attend a pretrial diversionary program.